Home News Canadian students bring joy to Swallowfield, Woodford Park
Canadian students bring joy to Swallowfield, Woodford Park

Canadian students bring joy to Swallowfield, Woodford Park

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Students
Shopkeeper, Shirley Smythe and (right) Fabian Brown, chief executive officer of Value Added Servcies Foundation, pose with students from Belleville High (from left) Eric Donaldson, Sean Kim, Vincent Ryu and Alex Nguyer.

A group of Canadian high school students last week brought joy to five small business owners who received much-needed assistance with their shops or stalls in the communities of Swallowfied and Woodford Park, in Kingston.

Twenty-three students from Nicholson Catholic College, in the community of Belleville in Ontario, Canada, in partnership with local charity group, Value Added Services Foundation, brought supplies to improve the aesthetics of the shops, as well as supplies, which together cost Can$4000.

Fabian Brown, chief executive officer of the foundation initiated the partnership with high schools in Canada specifically in Belleville and in Kingston in Ontario, told the Jamaica Observer:“ We are assisting entrepreneurial starts and development for the residents in Swallowfield and Woodpark communities, painting their stalls or shops and offering supplies, the stocks that they need — so everything from underwear, T-shirts, clothing, ground provision ect.”

He said one of the shops will be provided with chemicals such as washing soaps, fabuloso, polish, bleach, another will receive snacks items, and yet another that does only ground provision will also benefit while the other two will be given beverages and beers.

“The idea is that as we build communities and create opportunities, we are really promoting entrepreneurial development in the low-income communities and small start-ups in the communities of the Trafalgar divisions,” said Brown, who was spotted going around in the communities with the group of students.

According to Brown, the partnership, which started in February, will include 24 projects, that also include building homes in partnership with Food For the Poor.

A shopkeeper in the Swallowfied area, Shirley Smith, who received help with goods including flour, sugar, rice and oil for her shop, was very thankful.

“I am very grateful and appreciative for what they did, because I can now use the money that I was going to use to buy those things to buy other stuff,” she said after collecting the goods.

“Every mikkle mek a muckle,” she added.

In the meantime, two of the volunteers who spoke with Observer said they were happy to participate.

Celicia Forrestell, a grade 11 student, when asked why she decided to join the group said, “I was first interested because it seemed like a really neat experience, a once in a lifetime experience that I couldn’t pass up, and I would definitely like to go on more mission trips.”

Abby George, a 12th grade student, said: “I wanted to try and make a difference in someone’s life but I couldn’t do it on my own so I am doing it as a part of a group.”

Both also spoke glowingly about the island.

“I love Jamaica, the warmth of the people and the kindness.It doesn’t matter what their situation is, they always seem to have a smile on the face,” Forrestell said.

“It was eye-opening

“I am very grateful and appreciative for what they did, because I can now use the money that I was going to use to buy those things to buy other stuff,” she said after collecting the goods.

“Every mikkle mek a muckle,” she added.

In the meantime, two of the volunteers who spoke with Observer said they were happy to participate.

Celicia Forrestell, a grade 11 student, when asked why she decided to join the group said, “I was first interested because it seemed like a really neat experience, a once in a lifetime experience that I couldn’t pass up, and I would definitely like to go on more mission trips.”

Abby George, a 12th grade student, said: “I wanted to try and make a difference in someone’s life but I couldn’t do it on my own so I am doing it as a part of a group.”

Both also spoke glowingly about the island.

“I love Jamaica, the warmth of the people and the kindness.It doesn’t matter what their situation is, they always seem to have a smile on the face,” Forrestell said.

“It was eye-opening at first, but it is really beautiful and the people are very nice,” George added.

By: Tanesha Mundle

Original Article Found Here

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Charles Hyatt Being positive is a lifestyle and I live everyday loving the fact that I'm living every day. Each time I help someone smile, it reiterates the power of Good. So, I think, talk, eat, drink, Good News.

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